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There are so many variables that go into making a PIZZA. The hydration of the dough, flour, yeast and many more.. Amounts of any kind of yeast in a pizza can make a big difference. Most recipes posted on the web, use too much yeast in their recipes. What I have found out so far, is either bulk fermenting the dough or cold fermenting the dough will give a better flavor in the crust. I am still experimenting to find different flavors in the crust of pies. In my opinion pizza is all about the best flavor you can achieve in a crust. I still am on the journey about flavors in the crust. Even differences in temperatures in you home or times of the year can influence how much yeast to use. If you want a pizza to develop flavors in the crust, there are many ways to go about achieving this.

Pizzas

Pizzas
Preferment for Lehmann Dough Pizzas

Crust of Pizza

Crust of Pizza
Rim of Preferment Lehmann Formula

Adventure in Pizza Making

There are many ways to go about trying to make any kind of pizzas you want to create. PIZZA making is fun and also you get to eat your finished product. I learned to make all my pizza on http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php If you look on pizzamaking.com you can see all the beautiful creations of pizzas members make on this site. Members and moderators help members and guests achieve almost any kind of pizzas they want to create. Since joining this site, my pizza making skills have gone from non-existent to something much better. I invite you to take a look at this site.

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Sicilian Pizza

Sicilian Pizza
Sicilian Pizza with Preferment for Lehmann Dough

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

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Thursday, January 9, 2014

Neapolitan Pizza Made in the Blackstone Oven Unit

I mixed two Neapolitan doughs using the GM Neapolitan flour and also using Omid's method of being hand-inoculated with fresh yeast like Omid posted at Reply 448 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14506.msg152087.html#msg152087 I used two grams of fresh yeast though.

Since the batch for the two dough balls were mixed in the Kitchen Aid mixer it was not enough dough to use the spiral hook so I mixed with the flat beater. The dough was rested in-between mixes. I also wanted to try something out on the second mix with the flat beater and that was to mix at high speeds. The dough was then mixed at high speeds for 3 minutes. I wanted to see if that would make a tougher crust or foul it up somehow. The bulk dough was then stretched and folded two times (with 20 mintues in-between rests) before cutting and balling.

I purchased a cheese grater at the Dollar General Store today for 2.50 and went to town on pounding the plastic edges that were all around the cheese grater to make a chau-deflector the best I could.

It can be seen what temperature I loaded the two Neapolitan pizzas. The red valve was then turned up the whole way for both pizzas. I must not have had the defector positioned right on the first bake. On the second bake it was a little bit better but I need to work on that some more.

What I thought was interesting was the crumb was not at all tough from all of the mixing at high speeds with the flat beater.

The Neapolitan pies sure were not perfect but they tasted good to me. It has been awhile since I ate any Neapolitan pies. I would have tried out other dressings but I was not sure how these pizzas would try out.

Thanks Omid, your hand-inoculated method worked well!


Norma








































Saturday, December 28, 2013

Two more pizzas made in the Blackstone oven...A Greek style pizza and a Mack's pizza attempt


Since it has become warmer in our area I wanted to fire-up the BS oven again.  I also wanted to try some different pizzas in the BS.  I have some Pillsbury Patent 4X flour so I decided to try the formula set forth at Reply 242 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg144176.html#msg144176  I don't have a 10” pan, but I do have a cutter pan that is 10” across the top of the cutter pan.  I don't know if my cutter pan will be high enough. I also wanted to try a higher amount of oil in a dough so I picked the formulation at Reply 307 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9068.msg99472.html#msg99472  but I am attempting a 14” pizza.  I am not sure how this will bake in the BS with the higher amount of olive oil in the dough.  The formulation I used had a higher amount of IDY because it will only be cold fermented for one day.  

Both doughs were mixed in the Kitchen Aid mixer.  The Greek style dough was mixed with the flat beater only and the boardwalk style dough was mixed with the flat beater and the spiral hook.  For the boardwalk style dough I did use the Pillsbury Patent 4X flour too.

I did not remember to bring any cheese home from market so I have to find some at the supermarket.

In my opinion both of the dough formulations I tried and both of the final pizzas were really good.  Thanks Peter!

The Greek pizza is the first sets photos and the boardwalk style pizza are the last sets of photos.  The temperature can been seen before both bakes.  The two cheese blends went well together.  I don't think I ever tried those two cheeses together before.  The cheese on both pizzas tasted very good.  I used Greek oregano on both pizzas.

I think I am going to try offering Greek style pizzas at market again.  Maybe I won't get the same results as in the BS though.  The Greek style pizza baked fast in the BS, the edges did get crispy and the bottom crust seemed about right to me.  Spinach was put on top of the sauce for the Greek pizza and both pizzas had sandwich pepperoni added last. 

Move over Mack's.   In my opinion this pizza I attempted was much better than a Mack's pizza.  

It was 56 degrees F outside when I was baking in the BS.  Can't ask for much better weather than that.  

Norma