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There are so many variables that go into making a PIZZA. The hydration of the dough, flour, yeast and many more.. Amounts of any kind of yeast in a pizza can make a big difference. Most recipes posted on the web, use too much yeast in their recipes. What I have found out so far, is either bulk fermenting the dough or cold fermenting the dough will give a better flavor in the crust. I am still experimenting to find different flavors in the crust of pies. In my opinion pizza is all about the best flavor you can achieve in a crust. I still am on the journey about flavors in the crust. Even differences in temperatures in you home or times of the year can influence how much yeast to use. If you want a pizza to develop flavors in the crust, there are many ways to go about achieving this.

Pizzas

Pizzas
Preferment for Lehmann Dough Pizzas

Crust of Pizza

Crust of Pizza
Rim of Preferment Lehmann Formula

Adventure in Pizza Making

There are many ways to go about trying to make any kind of pizzas you want to create. PIZZA making is fun and also you get to eat your finished product. I learned to make all my pizza on http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php If you look on pizzamaking.com you can see all the beautiful creations of pizzas members make on this site. Members and moderators help members and guests achieve almost any kind of pizzas they want to create. Since joining this site, my pizza making skills have gone from non-existent to something much better. I invite you to take a look at this site.

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Sicilian Pizza

Sicilian Pizza
Sicilian Pizza with Preferment for Lehmann Dough

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Some about using Baker's percents

I would like to explain some things about trying to make pizza.  I will blog more about this at a later date.  Most of the recipes I have tried all my life, have been just using volume measurements. (cups, Tablespoons, teaspoons, glass measuring container, etc.) I didn’t even know about Baker’s percents and all what went into making formulas with Baker’s percents.  When I started to learn more about making pizza, I found out how helpful learning Baker’s percents were if I wanted to have good results with trying to make almost any kind of pizza.  I have learned that most people when using volume measurements don’t measure the same way.  I know that sounds dumb, but if you think about how the flour might be compacted in shipping or at the store and how some peoples measuring devices might not be the same, it will then make more sense.  I know I have talked to a lot of mostly home bakers that make cakes and cookies and have found out from them, when using old recipes, their finished products didn’t come out the same as years ago.  I think, but don’t know that flour have changed over the years and some brands of flours are better than others.  There are tighter specs on some brands of flour and different protein amounts in different flours.  I will blog about this more later.

Back to the Baker’s percents.  When I first looked at how to calculate Baker’s percents, it was very intimidating to me.  I still have problems with figuring out anything with Baker’s percents, but dough calculators do help in figuring out formulas for making pizza or other baked items.  Since I am older, when I was in school, they only had three courses to chose from.  They were Academic, Commercial, and General.  I picked the Commercial because I thought at that time, I had wanted to be a secretary.  I only had basic math and bookkeeping.  That is why I have so many problems with math.  I never even took math courses in algebra.  If I can learn how to use dough calculating tools, anyone can.  I can’t sit and figure out all my pizzas formulas using Bakers’ percents with paper and pencil, but I have learned to use the dough calculating tools to help.  Weighing by Baker’s percents can help to get a better pizza.  Also, then you can change any ingredient if your results aren’t what you desire, and proceed from there. 

I don’t know if anyone can follow what I have blogged so far, but I will try and explain all of this, in time.

Norma

A New Day

While I am trying to think about ways to help other people understand pizza better, I must admit I really don't understand pizza either.  I have learned many things along my short-time journey, but so many things having to do with making pizza, are still mysterious to me.  I will try at some time to explain all what I have learned so far and try to explain what still is mysterious to me.  I think pizza making and the bread world have a lot in common.  I still have a lot to learn about just how much they are related.  There are two great men that have studied bread in depth and from their teaching and things I could find out about them on the web, this has helped my journey.  I will blog about these men later.


Right now I am playing around with the milk kefir grains and seeing if somehow the milk kefir can be used to make a decent pizza, that has a lot of flavor in the crust.  Since this milk kefir isn't fed like regular starters (with flour and water), I don't know is there is a certain time or specific acidity to know when the milk kefir is ready.  I have achieved a decent looking pizza with the milk kefir starter and the taste of the crust is good, I want to be able to take this crust up to the next level.  I have now upped the amount of starter (poolish), that is going to be incorporated into the final dough.  Who knows if the added amount of milk kefir in the poolish will develop a better flavor in the crust.  That is one reason that I think pizza making is interesting.  You never know how your final pizza will turn out. 


When I first started making pizza in April of 2009, I really didn't understand how complex pizza making was.  My local pizzaman said he would help me learn to make dough, but he became ill and needed to go into the hospital, so it was left up to me to try and figure this all out.  I was even dumb enough to start a small pizza stand at our local farmers market, (Root's Market, in Manheim, Pa.), with out even knowing basically what all goes into making pizza.  I had already been in business for myself and my husband and I had various market stands, but we had made Caramel Popcorn, Cotton Candy, Clear Toy Candy, Brittles, Kettle Corn and other food items.  All the years in that business with my husband didn't help with trying to make pizza.  At first I had dough that was over fermented, dough that sprung back, wrong mixing times and temperatures, wrong cross stacking, and so many other things I did wrong.  Luckily I found pizzamaking.com and PMQ think tank. Both places members there helped me though the process of learning how to make a decent pizza.  I will biog. more about my experiences in learning in the future.  If I only can help one person understand pizza more, I will be glad to share the knowledge I have learned so far. 

Norma

Friday, November 5, 2010

Bittman’s Cracker Style Crust with No Yeast Pizza

A no yeast pizza.  That is hard to believe, but it was possible.  You never know what is possible when making any pizza, until you try. 

A few formulas  made possible by the help of Pete-zza.


King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (44.3017%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (1.04516%):
Olive Oil (26.9653%):
Total (172.31216%):
Single Ball:
    297.26 g  |  10.49 oz | 0.66 lbs
131.69 g  |  4.65 oz | 0.29 lbs
3.11 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.65 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
80.16 g | 2.83 oz | 0.18 lbs | 5.94 tbsp | 0.37 cups
512.21 g | 18.07 oz | 1.13 lbs | TF = 0.0483083
256.1 g | 9.03 oz | 0.56 lbs
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.04783; for two 12" x 17" rectangular skins; bowl residue compensation = 1%

You will note that I added a bowl residue compensation of 1%, which from my experience appears to be a good value for a food processor.

Of course, if one wants to make a round pizza following the same protocol of two skins using a thickness factor of 0.04783, the expanded dough calculating tool will provide the required amounts of ingredients. For example, for a 12" pizza using two superimposed skins, the dough formulation looks like this:

King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (44.3017%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (1.04516%):
Olive Oil (26.9653%):
Total (172.31216%):
Single Ball:
    179.78 g  |  6.34 oz | 0.4 lbs
79.65 g  |  2.81 oz | 0.18 lbs
1.88 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.39 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
48.48 g | 1.71 oz | 0.11 lbs | 10.77 tsp | 3.59 tbsp
309.78 g | 10.93 oz | 0.68 lbs | TF = 0.0483083
154.89 g | 5.46 oz | 0.34 lbs
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.04783; for two 12" skins; bowl residue compensation = 1%

You will also note that in the above examples I used Morton's Kosher salt since that is what you used in your last experiment. Clearly, as long as the baker's percent for the salt is kept the same, the expanded dough calculating tool can be used for other salt types. The tool can also be used with the other thickness factor (0.026905) if one wants to make a really thin crust, even with two layers. If it turns out that the amount of dough is too small to make in a food processor (which would also rule out a stand mixer), then one can resort to making the dough by hand. For those who are interested, the ingredients for a 12" pizza with two skins using a thickness factor of 0.026905 would be as follows:

King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (44.3017%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (1.04516%):
Olive Oil (26.9653%):
Total (172.31216%):
Single Ball:
    101.13 g  |  3.57 oz | 0.22 lbs
44.8 g  |  1.58 oz | 0.1 lbs
1.06 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.22 tsp | 0.07 tbsp
27.27 g | 0.96 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6.06 tsp | 2.02 tbsp
174.26 g | 6.15 oz | 0.38 lbs | TF = 0.0271741
87.13 g | 3.07 oz | 0.19 lbs
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.026905; for two 12" skins; bowl residue compensation = 1%


Another formula with NO yeast


Bittman’s Dough

Flour (100%):            179.31 g  |  6.32 oz | 0.4 lbs
Water (44.3017%):      79.44 g  |  2.8 oz | 0.18 lbs
Salt (1.5%):                 2.69 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.56 tsp | 0.19 tbsp
Olive Oil (26.9653%):     48.35 g | 1.71 oz | 0.11 lbs | 10.74 tsp | 3.58 tbsp
Total (172.767%):     309.78 g | 10.93 oz | 0.68 lbs | TF = 0.0483083
Single Ball:                     154.89 g | 5.46 oz | 0.34 lbs


Another formula set-forth by Pete-zza for a No yeast pizza

6" matzo:

King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (44.3017%):
Salt (1.04516%):
Olive Oil (26.9652%):
Total (172.31206%):
Single Ball:
    267.01 g  |  9.42 oz | 0.59 lbs
118.29 g  |  4.17 oz | 0.26 lbs
2.79 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
72 g | 2.54 oz | 0.16 lbs | 5.33 tbsp | 0.33 cups
460.09 g | 16.23 oz | 1.01 lbs | TF = 0.047832
38.34 g | 1.35 oz | 0.08 lbs
Note: Thickness factor = 0.0478318; for 12 dough balls for 6" matzos; no bowl residue compensation

For an 8" matzo, I got the following dough formulation is:

King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (44.3017%):
Salt (1.04516%):
Olive Oil (26.9652%):
Total (172.31206%):
Single Ball:
    267.01 g  |  9.42 oz | 0.59 lbs
118.29 g  |  4.17 oz | 0.26 lbs
2.79 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
72 g | 2.54 oz | 0.16 lbs | 5.33 tbsp | 0.33 cups
460.08 g | 16.23 oz | 1.01 lbs | TF = 0.026905
38.34 g | 1.35 oz | 0.08 lbs
Note: Thickness factor = 0.0269054; for 12 dough balls for 8" matzos; no bowl residue compensation

Carta Musica a recipe I want to try some day for sheet music Pizza

I want to try and use something like this recipe to try and experiment with this someday if I can figure out how to change this recipe into baker’s percents.  The name is so beautiful, Carta Musica. :)

All purpose flour: 2 cup
Semolina flour: ½ cup
Salt: ½ +1/8 teaspoon
Olive oil: 1/3 cup+ 2 tablespoon oil
Water: ¾ cup

New Formulas

Hopefully over time, I will be able to post formulas and instructions so even a beginner like I was just a short while ago, can make a decent pizza with some experiments.

Norma

First Formula I Tried When Learning to make Pizza

This formula can be scaled down to make just one pizza of any size.  This was my first formula I tried when learning to make pizza. :)  What a great journey it has been from this first formula.  This formula was also developed for me on pizzamaking.com

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
IDY (0.30%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (1%):
Total (161.05%):
    4224.77 g  |  149.02 oz | 9.31 lbs
2450.37 g  |  86.43 oz | 5.4 lbs
12.67 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 4.21 tsp | 1.4 tbsp
73.93 g | 2.61 oz | 0.16 lbs | 4.42 tbsp | 0.28 cups
42.25 g | 1.49 oz | 0.09 lbs | 9.39 tsp | 3.13 tbsp
6804 g | 240 oz | 15 lbs | TF = N/A

For 10 pounds, it is:

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
IDY (0.30%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (1%):
Total (161.05%):
    2816.52 g  |  99.35 oz | 6.21 lbs
1633.58 g  |  57.62 oz | 3.6 lbs
8.45 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.81 tsp | 0.94 tbsp
49.29 g | 1.74 oz | 0.11 lbs | 8.83 tsp | 2.94 tbsp
28.17 g | 0.99 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6.26 tsp | 2.09 tbsp
4536 g | 160 oz | 10 lbs | TF = N/A

And, for 20 pounds, it is:

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
IDY (0.30%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (1%):
Total (161.05%):
    5633.03 g  |  198.7 oz | 12.42 lbs
3267.16 g  |  115.24 oz | 7.2 lbs
16.9 g | 0.6 oz | 0.04 lbs | 5.61 tsp | 1.87 tbsp
98.58 g | 3.48 oz | 0.22 lbs | 5.89 tbsp | 0.37 cups
56.33 g | 1.99 oz | 0.12 lbs | 4.17 tbsp | 0.26 cups

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Giordano’s Stuffed Pizza-Deep Dish Pizza

The deep-dish pan I used was 12 1/2" across the top and 11 1/4" on the bottom.

I didn’t have Corn Oil, so I used Crisco Oil.  I used two kinds of flour.  One a no name brand AP from our local country store and the other was KAAP.
When I made this deep-dish stuffed crust I used hard butter to grease the bottom pan

I didn't have any problems rolling the dough out because of all the oil in the recipe.  I made the dough Sunday, left in the fridge to ferment and made it tonight.  It was finished on a screen.  I didn't really measure, but I think the top and bottom crusts were about the same in thickness.


Flour (100%):    1068.53 g  |  37.69 oz | 2.36 lbs
Water (41.1765%):    439.98 g  |  15.52 oz | 0.97 lbs
ADY (1.56862%):    16.76 g | 0.59 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.43 tsp | 1.48 tbsp
Salt (2.02665%):    21.66 g | 0.76 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.51 tsp | 1.5 tbsp
Corn Oil (16.6554%):    177.97 g | 6.28 oz | 0.39 lbs | 13.18 tbsp | 0.82 cups
Total (161.42717%):   1724.9 g | 60.84 oz | 3.8 lbs | TF = 0.1306813
Single Inner Ball:   663.42 g | 23.4 oz | 1.46 lbs
Single Outer Ball:   199.03 g | 7.02 oz | 0.44 lbs

I did take a picture of the top crust before baking and here is the top crust. Brushed top crust with olive oil. I rolled the dough with a rolling pin. With my oven not working the best, I could only get it up to 425, but kept watching how it was doing.
I put any kind of filling I had left in the fridge. Two kinds of mozzarella, two kinds of Parmesan, pepperoni, salami, sausage and sauce.  When finished put sauce, 2 kinds of Parmesan and parsley on top.


This dough was easy to roll out

If you use a different size pan, you can just use deep-dish calculator and enter you pan size for either two crusts or one if making a single crust. I used a sloping pan. I rolled out both skins to the same thickness. My deep-dish pans were dark pans, that were used, purchased on Ebay.

After rolling out the crust I brushed on oil when the skin while it was in the deep dish pan, before adding mozzarella, meat, sauce spread around, more meat, Parmesan cheese, mozzarella, top skin, brush top with oil, seal edges, put slices in top skin to let steam out, baked some, add sauce on top of crust and when the deep-dish is about finished baking add some parmesan.  I did put a top deep-dish pan on when first baking for about 4 minutes, took it off and continued baking another 4 minutes, flipped the pie out of the pan and finished baking on a screen.  I did cook all my meat before putting it into this deep-dish pizza.

Focaccia

This recipe is on the King Arthur Flour website.  I decided to try this recipe because it had Japanese Bread Flakes as a dressing.  Since I haven’t tried much with Sicilian pizza and the King Arthur Flour website said this pizza was a favorite for New Years Eve, I thought the pizza is fitting for tonight.
The crunchy crust was very tasty.  The Japanese Bread Flakes gave this pizza a totally different crunch on top.  We enjoyed the pizza.  The cheese goes on the dough first, sauce with onions, more cheese and Japanese Bread Flakes on top.

Crust

    * 3 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    * 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
    * 2 teaspoons instant yeast
    * 4 teaspoons Pizza Dough Flavor, optional but delicious
    * 2 tablespoons olive oil
    * 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons to 1 cup + 2 tablespoons lukewarm water*
    * *Use the lesser amount in summer (or in a humid environment), the greater amount in winter (or in a dry climate), and somewhere in between the rest of the year, or if your house is climate controlled.

Topping

    * 2 large sweet onions
    * 28-ounce can chopped or diced tomatoes
    * 2 teaspoons Pizza Seasoning, optional
    * 2 cups shredded mozzarella
    * 4 ounces provolone, shredded
    * 3/4 to 1 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese
    * 3 cups coarse dried bread crumbs, such as Panko
    * 6 tablespoons olive oil
    * 1 tablespoon Pizza Seasoning, optional

Crust

    * 12 3/4 ounces King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    * 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
    * 2 teaspoons instant yeast
    * 4 teaspoons Pizza Dough Flavor, optional but delicious
    * 7/8 ounce olive oil
    * 7 to 9 ounces lukewarm water*
    * *Use the lesser amount in summer (or in a humid environment), the greater amount in winter (or in a dry climate), and somewhere in between the rest of the year, or if your house is climate controlled.


Directions

1) To make the crust: Combine all of the ingredients and mix and knead to make a smooth, soft dough, using a stand mixer, bread machine, or your hands.

2) Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl or large 8-cup measure (or leave it in the bread machine), and let it rise till it's very puffy, about 90 minutes.

3) While the dough is rising, prepare the toppings. Start by peeling and slicing the onions, and frying them with a bit of olive oil till they're golden brown. This will take about 20 minutes. Midway through, add salt and sugar to taste, if desired; about 1 tablespoon sugar will heighten their flavor.

4) Add the tomatoes to the fried onions, along with the Pizza Seasoning, if desired. Simmer and stir for a couple of minutes. If the sauce seems overly liquid, continue to cook till it's firmed up a bit. You don't want it totally dry, like scrambled eggs, but neither do you want it swimming in liquid. Use your judgment. Turn off the heat, and let the mixture cool while the dough rises.

5) Stir together the bread crumbs, oil, and Pizza Seasoning, if you're using it. Set it aside.

6) Spray a large rimmed baking sheet (a 13" x 18" half sheet pan is perfect) with non-stick vegetable oil spray. Drizzle it with olive oil, tilting the pan so the oil spreads out a bit.

7) Gently deflate the risen dough, and stretch it into an oval in your hands. Plop the oval onto the baking sheet, and press it towards the edges. When it starts to fight back, walk away for 15 minutes. When you return, you should be able to press it to the edges and nearly into the corners. If you can't, give it another short rest, and try again. You want the dough to cover as much of the pan's bottom as possible (without making yourself too crazy about it).

Cool Cover the dough, and let it rise till puffy, about 90 minutes. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 425?F.

9) Uncover the dough, and sprinkle it with the shredded mozzarella and provolone. Then spread the tomato/onion sauce over the cheese.

10) Top with the Parmesan, then the bread crumbs.

11) Bake the pizza for 35 minutes, or until the crust and crumbs are brown. Remove it from the oven, and serve it hot or warm. Hint: to prevent a soggy bottom crust, cut the pizza in half crosswise, then lift each half onto a cooling rack. Cut individual slices with a pair of scissors.


The changes I made to this recipe were to mix the yeast, water, and about 3 tablespoons flour (from the volume measurements ) first and let that rest for about 45 minutes.  Didn’t use the Pizza Dough flavor.  Used 9 ounces of warm water.  Sea salt for pizza dough.  Only one large sweet onion, and added some crispy toasted onion bits near the end of frying the sweet onion.  No pizza seasoning in the topping.  Used Italian seasoning added to the Japanese Bread Flakes with oil. Used provolone, mozzarella, grated Parmesan and shredded Parmesan.  Pam to spray baking sheet, then more olive oil drizzled on baking sheet than they called for. Didn’t bake over a stone, just on the middle oven rack.  The dough was very sticky and tried to open it like a pizza.  That didn’t work, so just put in pan and pushed with my fingers until the dough was spread on the pan.   When the dough was rising the second time on the pan, it rose to about double in size. Added some Italian seasoning, sugar, and sea salt to tomato mixture.  Kneaded the dough by hand.
Some of things I like about this pizza were the really crunchy crust, blend of cheeses, and I really liked the crunchy top made with the Japanese Bread Flakes mixed with Italian seasoning and olive oil.  Will have to try those on another pizza.

Two videos of Pizza  in Italy making the foccacia like dough. http://video.aol.co.uk/video-detail/-pizza-rium/3866298856   and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzgjXuq1ztI&feature=related

This Focaccia type pie was made possible by members Matt (Mattew) and Infoodel (Toby) on www.pizzamaking.com

The pie turned out delicious.  It was almost what I was trying to achieve.  The only thing I want to change the next time I try this Sfincione type Focaccia would be to try an aluminum pan to bake the pie.  I wasn’t satisfied with how the black pan baked the dough.  I had to take the partially baked dough out of the pan and put it onto the screen to achieve a more crispy crust.  I did use olive oil in the pan, but can’t figure out if it was the pan or what.  The last time 2 times I baked the Sfincione type Focaccia in the aluminum pan, there wasn’t any problems with the crust browning.

The pie was dressed with fresh mozzarella I had frozen. (Terry) tdeane, helped me though that process.  The other two cheesed used in the pie were Parmesan grated and regular Parmesan.  I used my regular sauce that I make each week which also was frozen.  I caramelized onions again because we really liked the taste of them, before.  Panko bread flakes were also used mixed with olive oil, Italian seasoning and oregano.

The pie was parbaked at 450 degrees F for 10 minutes.  Then the dressing were added.

This pie had the airy crust, that I wanted.

This is the formula I used.  I used the Preferment Calculating Tool to figure out how much dough I thought I would need.  It still is confusing to me, but worked out okay.  I am still learning all this math stuff and calculating.

Total Formula:
Flour (100%):    488.62 g  |  17.24 oz | 1.08 lbs
Water (75%):    366.46 g  |  12.93 oz | 0.81 lbs
Salt (1.5%):    7.33 g | 0.26 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.53 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
Total (176.5%):   862.41 g | 30.42 oz | 1.9 lbs | TF = 0.13

Preferment: Natural starter Toby’s rye fed with caputo total 19.18 used for preferment
Flour:    18.91 g | 0.67 oz | 0.04 lbs          This part may not be right..but I used total 19.18 g
Water:    0.27 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs                 of preferment when measuring.
Total:    19.18 g | 0.68 oz | 0.04 lbs

Final Dough:
Flour:    469.71 g | 16.57 oz | 1.04 lbs
Water:    366.19 g | 12.92 oz | 0.81 lbs
Salt:    7.33 g | 0.26 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.53 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
Preferment:    19.18 g | 0.68 oz | 0.04 lbs
Total:    862.41 g | 30.42 oz | 1.9 lbs  | TF = 0.13

Matt’s formula

I decided to go with 70% hydration & in keeping with the traditional ingredients I incorporated potato into the dough.  I also decided to add a Sicilian twist & went with 50% semola.  The balance of the flour was Caputo pizzeria.  I also decided to use malt extract instead of sugar.  I went with a TF of .2.  My actual yield was 96% of the total dough weight so in future I will add 4% bowl residue.

After going through numerous recipes, I came up with the following:


Tipo 00   50.00%
Semola   50.00%
Water    70.00%
Salt   0.80%
Malt   0.80%
CY   5.00%
Potato   30.00%


Another formula I tried

Used Starters rye-high-gluten-some-wheat gluten that bubbled over yesterday
added to this starter
starter 80 g
400  grams water
30 g durum flour
5 g vital gluten
330 g AP Flour
1/4 tsp. IDY

Final Dough mixed in with above ingredients

45 g durum flour
330 g AP flour
1/4 tsp. IDY
10 g sea salt
24 g olive oil
100 g water

mixed, starter with other ingredients, let set for 3 hours, mixed in final dough, let 3 more hours, formed ball, let sit for 1 ½ hr.

Baked at 450 degrees F

3rd attempt using a different Formula


Measurement percent of flour      3rd foccacia attempt


Total Formula:
Flour (100%):    475.01 g  |  16.76 oz | 1.05 lbs
Water (85%):    403.76 g  |  14.24 oz | 0.89 lbs
Salt (2.7%):    12.83 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.3 tsp | 0.77 tbsp
Total (187.7%):   891.6 g | 31.45 oz | 1.97 lbs | TF = 0.1456

note: KAAP 138.35 g    Caputo 257.66 g   Durum 79.00 g

Preferment: Natural Starter   rye-wine 5g used Caputo to feed
Flour:    5.49 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs
Water:    11.14 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs
Total:    16.63 g | 0.59 oz | 0.04 lbs

Final Dough:
Flour:    469.52 g | 16.56 oz | 1.04 lbs
Water:    392.62 g | 13.85 oz | 0.87 lbs
Salt:    12.83 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.3 tsp | 0.77 tbsp
Preferment:    16.63 g | 0.59 oz | 0.04 lbs
Total:    891.6 g | 31.45 oz | 1.97 lbs  | TF = 0.1456

Last and not least, andre’s (andreguidon)  forumla

1kg flour
750ml water
5g IDY
20g salt

mix and let it out for 45minutes then 36 to 48h in the fridge

Total Formula:
Flour (100%):    2108.39 g  |  74.37 oz | 4.65 lbs   702.76g Semola d Grano Duro
                                                                                        1305.63g KAAP
Water (75%):    1581.29 g  |  55.78 oz | 3.49 lbs
Salt (1.50%):    31.63 g | 1.12 oz | 0.07 lbs | 6.59 tsp | 2.2 tbsp   I didn’t use this whole amount of salt and added only this morning.
Total (176.5%):   3721.31 g | 131.26 oz | 8.2 lbs | TF = 0.6077

Preferment:
Flour:    100.15 g | 3.53 oz | 0.22 lbs
Water:    5.27 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs
Total:    105.42 g | 3.72 oz | 0.23 lbs

Final Dough:
Flour:    2008.24 g | 70.84 oz | 4.43 lbs
Water:    1576.02 g | 55.59 oz | 3.47 lbs
Salt:    31.63 g | 1.12 oz | 0.07 lbs | 6.59 tsp | 2.2 tbsp
Preferment:    105.42 g | 3.72 oz | 0.23 lbs
Total:    3721.31 g | 131.26 oz | 8.2 lbs  | TF = 0.6077
                    
The natural starter used was rye-high-gluten-semolina-durum

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Adding All Pictures of Pizzas I Made Soon

I have made many different pizzas over the last year and a half.  I will soon add most of the pictures and formulas I used for those pictures.

Norma

Peter’s Formula with poolish for Milk Kefir Dough

With the dough formulation posted below, one can scale the formulation up or down as desired. It is also possible to use the Thickness Factor option rather than the Dough Weight option I used.

Norma's First Milk Kefir Dough by Pete-zza
Total Formula:
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour (100%):
Water (62.7316%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (2.0706%):
Olive Oil (0.91814%):
Total (165.72034%):

Milk Kefir:
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour:
Water:
Total:

Final Dough:
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour:
Water:
Morton's Kosher Salt:
Milk Kefir:
Olive Oil:
Total:
   
298.38 g  |  10.52 oz | 0.66 lbs
187.18 g  |  6.6 oz | 0.41 lbs
6.18 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.29 tsp | 0.43 tbsp
2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.61 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
494.48 g | 17.44 oz | 1.09 lbs | TF = N/A


0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs
41 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs
41 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs


298.38 g | 10.52 oz | 0.66 lbs
146.18 g | 5.16 oz | 0.32 lbs
6.18 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.29 tsp | 0.43 tbsp
41 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs
2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.61 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
494.48 g | 17.44 oz | 1.09 lbs  | TF = N/A
Note: Dough is for one 14" pizza; the milk kefir is 13.74% of the total formula flour and its percent water is 100%; no bowl residue compensation

I did not indicate any target dough ball weight in the above formulation but if you wanted to use a thickness factor of 0.10 for a 14" pizza, the target dough ball weight would be 3.14159 x 7 x 7 x 0.10 = 15.39 ounces (436.41 grams). Of course, if you want to get closer to the target dough ball weight, you can use a smaller Dough Weight in the tool.

Peter’s Formula with poolish for Milk Kefir Dough


Total Formula:
KASL Flour (100%):
Water/Milk Kefir (62%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (2.2%):
Olive Oil (1%):
Total (165.2%):

Milk Kefir Sourdough Starter:
KASL Flour:
Milk Kefir:
Total:

Final Dough:
KASL Flour:
Water:
Morton's Kosher Salt:
Milk Kefir Sourdough Starter:
Olive Oil:
Total:
   
268.14 g  |  9.46 oz | 0.59 lbs
166.24 g  |  5.86 oz | 0.37 lbs
5.9 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.23 tsp | 0.41 tbsp
2.68 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.6 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
442.96 g | 15.62 oz | 0.98 lbs | TF = 0.1015


20.11 g | 0.71 oz | 0.04 lbs
20.11 g | 0.71 oz | 0.04 lbs
40.22 g | 1.42 oz | 0.09 lbs


248.03 g | 8.75 oz | 0.55 lbs
146.13 g | 5.15 oz | 0.32 lbs
5.9 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.23 tsp | 0.41 tbsp
40.22 g | 1.42 oz | 0.09 lbs
2.68 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.6 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
442.96 g | 15.62 oz | 0.98 lbs  | TF = 0.1015
Note: Dough is for a single 14" pizza; nominal thickness factor = 0.10; target finished dough weight = 15.39 ounces/436.41 grams; the milk kefir preferment is equal to 15% of the total formula flour (or 24.2% of the total water/milk kefir or about 9% of the total dough batch weight), with a water content of 50% (poolish); bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

The above dough formulation presumes that you will make a milk kefir sourdough starter comprising equal weights of the milk kefir and flour (i.e., a poolish format) that is allowed to preferment at room temperature for a period of time before incorporating with the remaining ingredients into the final mix. For convenience, you might make more milk kefir sourdough starter than needed and measure out the desired quantity (about 40 grams) in preparation of the final mix. I don't have any idea as to how long the preferment period will be. It may be a period of hours or it may be a day or more. Whether the milk kefir sourdough starter will reach a break point or otherwise signal its readiness (e.g., by doubling in volume) remains to be seen.

Norma's First Milk Kefir Dough by Pete-zza

Norma's First Milk Kefir Dough by Pete-zza
Total Formula:
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour (100%):
Water (62.7316%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (2.0706%):
Olive Oil (0.91814%):
Total (165.72034%):

Milk Kefir:
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour:
Water:
Total:

Final Dough:
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour:
Water:
Morton's Kosher Salt:
Milk Kefir:
Olive Oil:
Total:
   
298.38 g  |  10.52 oz | 0.66 lbs
187.18 g  |  6.6 oz | 0.41 lbs
6.18 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.29 tsp | 0.43 tbsp
2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.61 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
494.48 g | 17.44 oz | 1.09 lbs | TF = N/A


0 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs
41 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs
41 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs


298.38 g | 10.52 oz | 0.66 lbs
146.18 g | 5.16 oz | 0.32 lbs
6.18 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.29 tsp | 0.43 tbsp
41 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs
2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.61 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
494.48 g | 17.44 oz | 1.09 lbs  | TF = N/A
Note: Dough is for one 14" pizza; the milk kefir is 13.74% of the total formula flour and its percent water is 100%; no bowl residue compensation

I did not indicate any target dough ball weight in the above formulation but if you wanted to use a thickness factor of 0.10 for a 14" pizza, the target dough ball weight would be 3.14159 x 7 x 7 x 0.10 = 15.39 ounces (436.41 grams). Of course, if you want to get closer to the target dough ball weight, you can use a smaller Dough Weight in the tool.

Preferment for Lehmann dough 16" Formulated by Pete-zza on pizzamaking.com

Total Lehmann NY Style Dough Formulation (for a single 16" pizza)
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour (100%):
Water (61%):
IDY (0.40%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (1%):
Total (164.15%):
    310.16 g  |  10.94 oz | 0.68 lbs
189.2 g  |  6.67 oz | 0.42 lbs
1.24 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.41 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
5.43 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.97 tsp | 0.32 tbsp
3.1 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.69 tsp | 0.23 tbsp
509.13 g | 17.96 oz | 1.12 lbs | TF = 0.08932
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.088; for one dough ball for a single 16" pizza; bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

Preferment (Poolish)
King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour (100%):
Water (100%):
IDY (0.30%):
Total (200.3%):
    75.66 g  |  2.67 oz | 0.17 lbs
75.66 g  |  2.67 oz | 0.17 lbs
0.23 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.08 tsp | 0.03 tbsp (this is a bit less than 3/32 t.)
151.55 g | 5.35 oz | 0.33 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Poolish represents about 80% of the Total Formula Water and about 30% of the total dough weight.

Final Mix
Poolish (from above):                                                         151.55 g | 5.35 oz | 0.33 lbs
Remaining Total Formula King Arthur Sir Lancelot Flour (100%):
Remaining Total Formula Water (48.4166%):
Remaining Total Formula IDY (0.4324%):
Total Formula Salt (2.31470%):
Total Formula Olive Oil (1.3228%):
    234.5 g  |  8.27 oz | 0.52 lbs
113.54 g  |  4 oz | 0.25 lbs
1.01 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.34 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
5.43 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.97 tsp | 0.32 tbsp
3.1 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.69 tsp | 0.23 tbsp
Total Dough Batch Weight:                                                 509.13 g | 17.96 oz | 1.12 lbs   

Ischia Dough Formula

Total Formula:
Flour (100%):                273.98 g  |  9.66 oz | 0.6 lbs
Water (60.9%):                166.85 g  |  5.89 oz | 0.37 lbs
Salt (2.2%):                     6.03 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.08 tsp | 0.36 tbsp
Oil (1%):                             2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.61 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
Total (164.1%):                  449.6 g | 15.86 oz | 0.99 lbs | TF = 0.103022

Preferment:
Flour:                         20.55 g | 0.72 oz | 0.05 lbs
Water:                         20.55 g | 0.72 oz | 0.05 lbs
Total:                           41.1 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs

Final Dough:
Flour:                         253.43 g | 8.94 oz | 0.56 lbs
Water:                       146.31 g | 5.16 oz | 0.32 lbs
Salt:                                   6.03 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.08 tsp | 0.36 tbsp
Preferment:                         41.1 g | 1.45 oz | 0.09 lbs
Oil:                                   2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.61 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
Total:                          449.6 g | 15.86 oz | 0.99 lbs  | TF = 0.103022

I also did use my Kitchen Aid Mixer to mix this dough.

Video of Kitchen Aid almost finished mixing the dough.  Dough was 75 degrees F and left for 5 hours to bulk ferment before balling.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8M8WgPnEUG4

Norma

Video...Steve’s WFO Baking Ischia Starter Pizza

Video of Pie Baking in Steve's Oven.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJf7t3FchmA

More New Pictures of pizzas I have made in the past

I have many ideas for making different kinds of pizzas.  I will post different formulas for making different kinds of pizzas that I did have success with.  I mostly use Baker's percents for pizzas I make.  By using Baker's Percents, it gives you a better chance of having a successful pizza.

I have been away from this Blog for a Long While

I really haven't worked on this Blog for a long while, but soon I will have more updates. I am still learning more about pizzas with each passing day. This is a journey that will continue for the rest of my life. Pizza is so mysterious in so many ways.